The Canadian Collision Regulations govern navigation rules on Canadian waterways and help boaters determine which craft has the right-of-way. These rules apply to all vessels and to all waters in Canada.

Your Responsibilities
As a Canadian boater “you must use all available means, appropriate to prevailing circumstances and conditions, to make a full appraisal of navigation situations and determine if the risk of collision exists.” This means that you must know and understand Canada’s navigation rules.

Determining Right-of-Way
First, you should become familiar with right-of-way terminology:

  • Stand-on Craft
    Boats with the right-of-way are called “stand-on craft”. Stand-on craft are able to maintain their speed and course when approaching another vessel.
  • Give-Way Craft
    Boats that do not have the right-of-way are called “give-way craft”. Give-way craft must take early and substantial action to steer clear of the stand-on craft, altering their speed and direction to avoid a collision.


Several factors determine which craft has the right-of-way:

  • The type of craft you’re operating
  • The type(s) of craft(s) you’re approaching
  • The position and direction from which other boat(s) are approaching
  • The type of waterway on which you’re operating


Power-driven vessels approaching each other establish right-of-way by determining each boat’s position relative to the other. To properly understand right-of-way, you must be able to recognize the “sectors” of navigation, including the Port sector, Starboard sector and Stern sector. You should reference these sectors relative to other boat traffic in order to determine who has the right-of-way.

Keeping it Simple

  • Port
    If a power-driven boat approaches your boat from the port sector, maintain your course and speed with caution.

    Port Approach


     
  • Starboard
    If any vessel approaches your boat from the starboard sector, you must keep out of its way.

    Starboard Approach


     
  • Stern
    If any vessel approaches your boat from the stern (from behind your boat) you should maintain your course and speed with caution.

    Overtaking Another Vessel
     


The Give Way zone
Your Starboard Sector (the sector defined by your green starboard sidelight) is the “Danger” or Give Way Zone.

Navigation Giveway Zone

When another boater sees your green light, he or she has the right-of-way. In this situation you will see the port side of the other boat and it’s red port sidelight. You must take early and substantial action to avoid a collision.

Navigating At Night
Right-of-way and navigation rules are the same whether operating during the day or at night. However, while operating at night or during periods of restricted visibility, you must determine the speed, position, and size of other boats according to the navigation lights they exhibit.

Navigation lights must be used on any pleasure craft that operates from sunset to sunrise or during periods of restricted visibility. The navigation lights you are required to display depend on the following:

  • The size of your craft
  • Whether it is sail-driven or power-driven
  • Whether it is underway or at anchor

Power-driven pleasure crafts must exhibit a forward masthead light, sidelights and a sternlight. Smaller craft (less than 12 m in length) are able to exhibit an all-round light in lieu of a masthead and stern light. Accordingly, many small boats (such as bowriders and runabouts) typically have an all-round light affixed to the top of a light pole that can be placed at the stern of the craft. When underway, this light functions as a combined masthead and sternlight. When at anchor, this light also functions as an all-round light.

Head-On Approach At Night
If you meet a vessel and see a green, red and white light, you are approaching another power-driven ves- sel head-on. In this situation neither vessel has the right-of-way. Both operators must take early and substantial action to steer well clear of the other vessel. Both operators should reduce their speed and steer to starboard.

If you meet a vessel and see a green and red light but no masthead (white) light, then you are approaching a sail-driven vessel. You are the give-way craft and must yield right-of-way to the sailing vessel.

Head On Approach At Night



Port Approach At Night

If a green and white light is visible, then another craft is approaching you from the port (left) side. In this situation, you are the stand-on craft and should maintain your speed and course. The other craft should take early and substantial action to steer well clear of your craft.

Port Approach At Night



Starboard Approach At Night
If a red and white light is visible, then another craft is approaching you from the starboard (right) side. In this situation you are the give-way craft and must yield right-of-way. You should take early and substantial action to steer well clear of the other craft. Reduce your speed, change direction and pass at safe distance behind the other boat.

Starboard Approach At Night

 

  • Safe Boating Tip
    A simple way to decipher power boat navigation lights is to remember the following:
    • If you see a green light you can “go” (Another boat is approaching from your port side)
    • If you see a red light you should “stop” (Another boat is approaching from your starboard side)
       

Overtaking At Night
If only a white light is visible, you are approaching another craft from behind. You are the give-way-craft and must take early and substantial action to steer well clear by altering your course and passing at a safe distance on the starboard (right) or port (left) side.

Overtaking At Night


What else does a white light indicate?

If you see only a white light, it can generally indicate one of three things:

  • You are approaching another craft from behind
  • You are approaching a non-powered craft
  • You are approaching a craft that is at anchor

Remember: In any of these situations, you do not have the right-of-way and must take early and substantial action to steer well clear and pass at a safe distance.

Approaching Non-Powered Boats At Night
If you are approaching a non-powered craft, you are the give-way craft and must yield the right of way. You should take early and substantial action to stay well clear and pass at a safe speed and distance.

Anchoring At Night
When anchored, you should exhibit your boat’s all-round white light. This single white light indicates to other boaters that you are at anchor. Do not display your green and red sidelights as these indicate to other boaters that you are underway.

Learning More About Safe Boat Navigation
By taking the BOATsmart! Safe Boating Course you can learn Canada's navigation rules. You'll also learn everything you need to know in order to obtain your Pleasure Craft Operator Card, commonly known as a Canadian boating license. To find an approved boating safety course in your community click here or call 1-877-792-3926.


Pleasure Craft Operator Card

 

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