Boating Laws in Canada

Boating in Rivers, Canals, and Shipping Lanes

River Navigation Operating a pleasure craft or PWC on a river is different than operating on an open waterway. Boating in rivers presents its own unique hazards and conditions. Some rivers may exhibi...

Distress Signals

Understanding and Using Distress Signals Pleasure craft operators must be able to recognize, use and properly exhibit distress signals as required by the Small Vessel Regulations. Depending on the si...

Day Beacons

Day Beacons are signs posted on land or water. They are without lights and are intended for daytime use only. Day Beacons use the same colours as the Lateral System and are typically used as channel o...

Boat Navigation at Night

Boat Navigation at Night: Head-on Approach If you meet a vessel and see a green, red and white light, you are approaching another power-driven vessel head-on. In this situation neither vessel has th...

Swamping or Sinking

Hull Leaks and Flooding Striking underwater hazards such as a submerged rock, sunken island, shoal or deadhead may cause serious damage to your craft resulting in a breach of the hull. If the hull of ...

Boating in Restricted Visibility

Safe Operation in Restricted Visibility Boaters should take additional care when operating at night or during periods of restricted visibility such as fog, darkness or heavy rain. Remember: If you ar...

Respecting the Marine Environment in Canada

Marine Environment and Environmental Responsibility It is illegal to pollute Canadian waterways. Always use caution when refueling and be sure not to spill excess fuel into the water. When operating y...